Port Hardy Fishing Report


Find out what’s working and what’s not when fishing in the Port Hardy area on Northern Vancouver Island. Tips, best practices, places and the go-to lures are just a sample of what you’ll find in our fishing report.

Port Hardy Tides


Port Hardy Fishing Report

August provides some excellent chances for nailing the big one you’ve been looking for. The Deserter island group is a great Chinook producer; try fishing between 60 and 80 ft. Try the GJFSF Green Haze teaser head or # 4 Swiftsure spoon with Lemon Lime Chartreuse Moon Jelly Flasher from Gibbs. Also try Duval Point, or Daffine on a low slack. Your best combos will be a #3.5 Homeland Security spoon and Monkey Puke flasher, or Midnight Mist flasher and Glo Flow Green and Red Titan spoon by Oki Tackle. Both sizes of anchovies will work here. I prefer the 5′ to 5′ anchovy, but I will leave it up to you. Try the Yellow Green Mist Glow teaser head. I have also had success on the small Atomic Plugs and micro flashers–old school sometimes works best. This year’s salmon fishing so far has been pretty good–the average spring around is 20 to 25 lbs, with the odd 35- to 39-lb Chinook being brought to the dock.

Port Hardy halibut fishing has remained good so far. Try the sand flats at the Airport and Taylor Bank; both offer many shoals with tons of structure to fish. Also look for large shoals or pinnacles on your GPS; these spots should hold baitfish the halibut feed off. These spots hold 20- to 65-lb halibut. Popular methods are bottom trolling with large spoons or whole herring, or with Delta Mudrakers and salmon bellies. I prefer to anchor for halibut. Please ensure you record your halibut lengths and answer questions from our fish observers. Also please remember how important it is to identify your catch properly when you are asked by the observer–giving the wrong answer can do more harm than good.

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Steven Cahill
Hook’n Them Up Fishing Charters
(855) 805-3474 (FISH) toll-free
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www.vanislefishing.com

Port Hardy Fishing Report Archives

Port Hardy, located on Vancouver Island’s northeast shore on Queen Charlotte Strait, is known as one of the best places on the island to catch all five salmon species. July provides some excellent chances at nailing the big one you’ve been looking for.

The Deserters Group is a pretty good early Chinook producer–try fishing between 70 and 100 feet. For coho and chum in early July, try Duval Point, Hardy Bay, and Masterman Island. Your best combo will be the #4 Atomic Plug Green-White Glow and Lila Micro Flasher or Monkey Puke Flasher and Glo-Flow Green and Red Titan spoon by Oki Tackle.

You can also try fishing Wall Street as well if you know the secret code–try the #4 Swiftsure spoon and Lemon Lime flasher from Gibbs Delta Tackle or the Yellow Green Mist JDF Green Maverick Jellyfish Flasher by Oki Tackle. Both sizes of anchovies will work here. You may also want to try trolling slow using a cut-plug herring. While doing this, please be mindful of the other boaters moving in a faster tack. This year salmon fishing has been pretty good; the average size spring around is 20 to 25 lbs and the odd 32- to 38-lb Chinook being brought to the dock. Mid-July will hold pinks–try a Purple & Pink Squirt, but use a bigger hook; the Chinooks will hit this as well, and if you have an undersized hook say bye-bye to your shiny friend. Hopefully we will see some sockeye retention again for July and August–fingers crossed.

Port Hardy halibut fishing has remained good so far. While halibut fishing in July, try the sand flats at the airport; it offers many different shoals with tons of structure to fish. Also look for large shoals or pinnacles on your GPS; these spots should hold bait which the halibut feed off of. But you have to have some real local knowledge to hunt these flat ones and succeed. These spots hold 20- to 65-lb halibut, and a couple of popular methods for these areas are bottom trolling with large spoons or whole herring. Try jigging with Delta Mudrakers and salmon bellies.

Please ensure you record your halibut lengths and answer questions from our fish observers. Please see the DFO website for IREC info and record your halibut catch. The data they collect is very important to our retention limits. As a professional angler I can’t stress this enough. It’s an absolute must; please do your part.

In June, Duval Point is usually the early Chinook producer. Try the Happy Hooker Titian spoon and Yellow-Green Mist Big Shooter flasher or a Green Haze teaser head.

You should also try the #4 Tossed Salad spoon and Lemon Lime Series LLC Chartreuse Moon Jelly flasher. This seems to be the most effective combo this year. You may also want to try trolling slow using a cut-plug herring. While doing this, please be mindful of the other boaters moving in a faster tack, so you don’t cause traffic issues for others around you.

This year salmon fishing has been pretty good. The average size spring has been 15 to 25 lbs with the odd 28- to 32-lb Chinook being brought to the dock. Try trolling around 45 to 100 feet. Pay attention to your GPS, because there are several spots where the bottom just loves to sneak up on you, and it loves eating cannon balls. Don’t be afraid to adjust your speed to see what’s most effective.

While fishing in Port Hardy, please visit our good friends at Redden Net–they will certainly try to take care of all your tackle needs, crab pots, or boat lines.

Port Hardy halibut fishing has remained good so far, with fishing coming from Pine Island and Bukle Group, but you have to have some real local knowledge to hunt these flat ones.

For halibut fishing in June, Port Hardy offers many different shoals with tons of structure to fish. Try the sand flats at the Airport or Taylor Bank. These spots hold 20- to 75-lb halibut, and a couple of popular methods for these areas are bottom trolling with large spoons, whole herring (same set up as you would with anchovy), or Mudrakers and salmon bellies.
Please ensure you record your halibut lengths and answer questions from our fish observers. Please see the DFO website for IREC info and record your halibut catch. The data they collect is very important to our retention limits. As a professional angler I can’t stress this enough. It’s an absolute must folks, so please do your part.

We would also like to mention the issues around identifying your catch with special concern to yelloweye over canary rock cod. Yelloweye have bright yellow eyes and canaries do not. If you suspect you have an incorrect one on please bring it up slowly to avoid barotrauma–aka ‘pressure shock’–and have a descending device ready.

The arrival of spring brings calmer seas and better weather, although we seem to get an abundance of liquid sunshine, some years more than others.

By mid- to late May the Chinook will start moving through and keep in- creasing in size and numbers until the end of August and early September.

Try Duval Point with a cut plug her- ring on the slack, then run down to Daffine Island to finish things off. You may also want to try a Monkey Puke Flasher (Oki Tackle) and a #5 Gibbs Gold Clendon Stewart spoon, my favourite tackle combo. I swear by it. When nothing else will work, you can also try out some glow spoons from Pesca Lures.

This year salmon fishing has been pretty good; the average size spring around is 15 to 20 pounds and the odd 23- to 25-pound Chinook being brought to the dock. Try trolling around 45 to 100 feet; pay attention to your GPS as there are several spots the bottom just loves to sneak up on you and will definitely claim your cannon- balls. Also, while fishing in Port Hardy, please visit our good friends at Redden Net. They will certainly try to take care of all your tackle needs.

Port Hardy and Port McNeill halibut fishing started in early April, but you have to have some real local knowledge to hunt these flat ones. While May halibut fishing in Port Hardy offers many different shoals with tons of structure to fish, give a try to the sand flats near the airport. These spots hold 20- to 60-pound halibut, and a couple of popular methods for these areas are bottom trolling with large spoons or a spreader bar with 10-inch power grub, whole herring or with Delta Mudrakers and salmon bellies.

This year’s hali fishing will be a little more challenging with a smaller slot size, but skilled anglers should have no problem filling your coolers with your favourite fish. Please ensure you record your halibut lengths and answer questions from our fish observers. The data they collect is very important to our retention limits. So tips up and tight lines and keep on fishin’!

With the arrival of spring brings calmer seas and better weather, although we seem to get an abundance of liquid sunshine, some more years than another. You still need to pick your days when fishing at this time of the year, paying attention to weather and the tides.

The winter springs are still about still feeding in Hardy Bay and the bottom of Daffine Island. Try a #4 Glow West Coast Express Pesca Fishing spoon or the #4 Blue Nickle Mist Oki Spoon. Combine either of these with the Silver Fever Flasher from Hotspot and you’re ready to rock and roll. The average size winter spring around is between 10 and 14 pounds. Try trolling around 45 to 100 feet; pay attention to your GPS as there are several spots where the bottom just loves to sneak up on you and it will definitely claim your cannon balls.

Halibut fishing starts in early March; many different shoals around the area have great structure and will hold fish. Try the sand flats near the Airport or off of Story’s Beach These spots hold 20- to 65-pound halibut. Popular methods for these areas are bottom trolling. I sometimes will use a rod holder than actively jigging; rig a spreader bar with herring, salmon belly strips, squid, or octopus. Large Berkley Power Bait Glow or White Power Grubs work exceptionally well on a spreader bar, or rigged on a lead head jig.

Please ensure you record your halibut lengths, from our fish observers. The data they collect is very important to our retention limits. Please participate in the DFO IREC Survey, your catch counts. We would also like to add that if you see illegal long lining equipment meaning no numbers or in restricted areas, please inform MPO right away; take a picture and date stamp it with the area it was in. The fishing rules and regulations apply to everyone.

As the season starts to wind down in September there are plenty of opportunities to hook a few shiny ones. Duval Point and Daffine Island are never bad places to try on the early morning slack/flood tide; it’s one of my favorite Hardy places to fish. But a trip to the tip of the Gordon Islands and the Deserters Group can also pay off in a big way. Try between 50 and 130 feet for those big Chinook and 30 to 60 feet for pinks and coho. Try the 252 Coho Special Glow JFD anchovy teaser head and the 724 Lila Jelly Fish Flasher, or another great standby is the #5 50/50 Clendon Stewart spoon, and the 50/50 Chrome /brass Wonder spoons with a Green Chartreuse flasher. Cut-plug herring and anchovy is still a popular method. Beware that you will be moving far slower than other anglers while fishing this method.

This is also the prime period for fly fishing off the estuaries and beaches, where pink salmon will hold until the first good rain, usually at some point in early to mid-September. Pretty well any pink-coloured fly will attract them. Casting spoons, weighted spinners and small drift-jigs are another option. Hot pink works well, as do silver or gold with metallic blue, hot pink or chartreuse highlights.

For some great halibut fishing head for Shadwell Passage, the sand flats at the Airport, Taylor Bank or Ripple Passage. These spots offer many different shoals with tons of structure to fish. Rig a spreader bar with a 1½- to 2-pound sinker and bait up with salmon belly, a shishkebob of octopus and herring, or simply a white Berkley Power Grub. Drop it down to the bottom where the depth sounder indicates about 300 to 400 feet (90 to 120 metres on the marine chart). Top-rigged dink and pipe jigs with colourful skirts are also a good bet, but sweeten them up with a bit of fresh bait. Have a good study of your GPS and watch for the slack tides. I prefer to anchor for halibut and I use a mix of bait and jigging to find out what is working on any day. Please ensure you record your halibut lengths and answer questions from our fish observers. Your catch counts.

August provides some excellent chances at nailing the big one you’ve been looking for. Castle Point is a great Chinook producer. Also, Duval Point, Hardy Bay, Gordon Islands, and off Round Island have all been productive at depths between 60 and 160 feet.

Use the GJFSF Green Haze teaser head or #4 Swiftsure spoon with Lemon Lime Chartreuse Moon Jelly Flasher. Good combos might be #3.5 Homeland security spoon and Monkey Puke Flasher or Midnight Mist Flasher and glow flow green and red titan spoon. Both size of anchovies will work here or the GJSF Yellow Haze Teaser Head. I have also had successes on the small Tomic plugs using a micro flasher.

This year salmon fishing has been pretty good with the average size spring around 15 to 25 pounds and the odd 28- to 35-pound Chinook being brought to the dock.

Lots of halibut have been taken this year from the usual spots like Gordon Channel, the Buckle Group, Ripple Passage, Morgan Shoal, and Taylor Bank, in sizes ranging from little chickens to big barn doors. Chicken halibut are most abundant and by far the best eating, and also a lot safer to get into your boat without breaking bones or equipment. These critters bite readily on herring, octopus and salmon chunks fished off a spreader bar, and most jigs are very effective. Good depths are where the bottom reads 80 to 120 metres, fairly flat and with a gravel or sand surface.

Please ensure you record your halibut lengths on your license and answer questions from our fish observers.

The arrival of spring brings calmer seas and better weather although we seem to get an abundance of liquid sunshine. You still need to pick your days when fishing in March and April. Whether you fish locally around Duval Point and the Masterman Islands or run all the way out to Pine Island, there are always plenty of great fishing opportunities for salmon and bottom fish around the Port Hardy area.

You will want to try the Skinny G Trap shack spoon and Yellow Green Jelly Flasher or the #4 Cop Car Glow Spoon or Blue Nickle Mist spoon and High Roller Flasher. Try trolling around 45 to 100 feet and pay attention to your GPS. There are several spots at which the bottom just loves to sneak up on you and it will definitely claim your cannon balls.

Port Hardy halibut fishing starts February 1. While halibut fishing in March and April, Port Hardy offers many different shoals with tons of structure to fish. Try the sand flats near the Airport or off of Story’s Beach, These spots hold 20- to 65-pound halibut and a couple of popular methods for these areas are bottom trolling with large spoons or Gibbs Spreader Bar with eight-inch hali hawg grub, whole herring or with Delta Mudrakers. Please ensure you record your halibut lengths.

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